Teaching a culture of non violence

Taking learners to a new level of conciousness

Meet Zwivhuya Ramashia, Humane Education’s teacher at Constitution Hill

The Humane Education Trust is privileged to have been invited by Reuben Phasha, Heritage, Education and Tourism Manager at Constitutiion Hill in Braamfontein, Johannesburg, to be a presence in the Children’s Room on a daily basis.

 

To this end, Zwivhuya Ramashia is engaged as our humane educator on the Hill, guiding learners towards an understanding that how we treat animals is directly linked to our Constitutional Rights and Responsibilities.

 

 

We talked to Zwivhuya about her role on Constitution Hill...

 

 

Animal Voice:
Roughly, how many Gauteng learners do you see every week and how old are they?

 

Zwivhuya:
I teach about 150 Gauteng learners a week, ranging in age from 5  to 13 years old.

 

Animal Voice:
Do you take them to the cell that Mahatma Gandhi once occupied and ask them to consider why he said: “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”?

 

Zwivhuya:
Yes, Gandhi’s cell is at Number 4 Section which was for Black male prisoners.

 

Animal Voice: 
Do you find that the learners are interested when you ask them to consider the implications of Gandhi’s quote? Are they interested in this new area of consciousness about our relationship with animals?

 

Zwivhuya:
It absolutely fascinates them that treating animals with decency is linked to our own constitutional right to dignity. They begin to understand that cruelty is bad and they even become kinder and stop teasing each other. They love reading the Caring Kids book. The learners who come regularly to the Children’s Room after their normal school day, even arrive earlier than they used to before the humane education programme started. There is no doubt about the fact that this programme is sensitising them to issues they would never even have thought about before.

 

Animal Voice:
Is there a comment by one of the learners that sticks in your mind?

 

Zwivhuya:
Yes. A learner from Vine College, a school in Johannesburg City, said to me: “Why must I take care of a dog when it just makes lots of noise throughout the whole night when I actually want to sleep? Why must I be good to a dog when it bites people?” And even his attitude is changing as he realises that humane education is about who we are as individuals, how we think, how we behave, how we treat ourselves, others, animals and the environment at large. It’s about claiming our constitutional right to dignity.

 

Animal Voice:
Do you find our Teacher’s Guide to Humane Education is working for you?

 

Zwivhuya:
Yes, and the fact that the Guide is aligned with the Curriculum means the learners can take the message back with them into their own classrooms.

 

Animal Voice:
Has Humane Education changed the way that you yourself think?

 

Zwivhuya:
Humane Education has changed the way I think in a huge way, I have learned more than I can really explain. I have developed a different sense of caring – both for people and animals. One incident that comes to mind is when I woke up one Saturday recently and set about doing my usual chores. I went behind the house, only to find a little mouse trapped inside the bucket. It couldn’t get out. The first instinct that came to my mind was to rescue it immediately. Before I was introduced to humane education, I would have left it to die inside that bucket and then thrown it into the dustbin.

 

Animal Voice:
What’s the best part of teaching humane education?

 

Zwivhuya:
It’s the knowledge that after every lesson I have impacted on the learners in a good way. I believe that none of the learners want to be rude and cruel but they are raised in an environment where the community disregards animal suffering and they simply think that this is the way it must be. Humane education has an impact on their moral development and it gives them a good sense about themselves.

 

Animal Voice:
Thank you Zwivhuya for being such an inspiring teacher.

 

Any school wishing to get in touch with Zwivhuya can email her onz.ramashia@constitutionhill.org.za

 

 

  • HET facebook.png
  • CWF facebook.png

email: avoice@yebo.co.za

Intl: +27 21 852 8160  .  Tel: 021 852 8160  .  Fax: 021 4131297

 

 

© Animal Voice South Africa   .  © Humane Education    .   © Compassion In World Farming

This website is administered by Animal Voice South Africa and The Humane Education Trust which is licensed to represent Compassion in World Farming in South Africa.

 Humane Education   |  NPO # 039 611 NPO  |  PBO # 130004237  |  Trust # IT450/2001

 

Webiste Design:  - Kelly Schlesinger